Is Your Thyroid The Real Reason For Your Hair Loss?

Guides ● December 2018

In 30 seconds

  • Hair loss can be caused by thyroid issues so get checked out by your doctor.
  • All biological functions in your body rely on hormones produced by the thyroid, from your sex drive to your hair growth.
  • Natural treatment remedies include boosting iron levels. There are also medical treatments available.

Thyroid and Hair Loss

Keep noticing hairs on your keyboard? On your pillow? In the plug hole? It happens to all of us eventually. If you’ve got less up top than you once did – or less than you’d like – it’s good to know the reasons. And the solutions, if you don’t fancy embracing the bald.

This type of hair loss is called male pattern baldness or androgenetic alopecia. It’s thought of as ‘the permanent kind’. As opposed to the temporary sort of hair loss that can happen sometimes thanks to stress – or thyroid issues. The follicles shrivel up and are unable to regrow. This means our hair looks thinner. Each hair actually becomes thinner – and there’s an overall loss of density.1 Truth is, for some of us, the loss isn’t actually permanent. And it can definitely be delayed or slowed down, according to experts.2

First things first. Find out the causes of your hair loss. We’d recommend getting a doctor to check it out. There are a number of reasons for hair loss and in this handy guide we investigate if your thyroid may be to blame.

Thyroid and Hair Loss

Did you know that everyone loses between 50 and 100 hairs a day? The problem occurs when normal growth is interrupted and for whatever reason your thatch doesn’t replenish itself. The good news? If your hair loss is from a thyroid disease then it’s temporary, according to Healthline. The less good news? It might be hard to notice because this kind of hair loss usually develops slowly. Rather than missing patches of hair, you may find your barnet is just thinner and has less overall volume or density.3

Did you know that everyone loses between 50 and 100 hairs a day? The problem occurs when normal growth is interrupted and for whatever reason your mane doesn’t replenish itself.

Thyroid: The Lowdown

  • The thyroid gland secretes hormones into the bloodstream, which are then transported to different parts of the body.4
  • These hormones are critical for maintaining the heart, brain, muscles, and other organs by metabolizing energy in the body and regulating temperature.5
  • All biological functions in your body rely on hormones produced by the thyroid, from your sex drive to your hair growth.6
  • The thyroid gland absorbs iodine in food and produces two main hormones, which are regulated by the pituitary gland. An interference in the working of this gland can cause it to produce too much, or too little of these hormones.7
  • Overproduction of hormones is called hyperthyroidism and underproduction is referred to as hypothyroidism.8
  • According to Healthline, when hormone production is disrupted, specifically of hormones T3 and T4, it affects the development of hair at the root.9 The result? Hair falls out and may not be replaced by new growth.
All biological functions in your body rely on hormones produced by the thyroid, from your sex drive to your hair growth.

The Solutions

  • The good news is there are plenty of natural remedies. These include boosting iron levels.10 Munch on dark green leafy veg, such as watercress and kale. Add more lean red meat, beans and lentils into your diet.
  • Boost your nutritional intake. You’ll feel better and your thatch will thank you. Make sure you’re getting plenty of  B-7 (biotin) and B complex, zinc, copper, iron, vitamins C, E, and A, co-enzyme Q10.
  • Cut down on inflammatory foods such as fried food and sugar. Plus, go easy on the caffeine and alcohol too. Or cut back completely.11
  • Medical interventions include levothyroxine for those suffering from hypothyroidism, and carbimazole and beta blockers for those suffering from hyperthyroidism.12 Always take these under supervision of a doctor because you’ll need your hormones monitored regularly.
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